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How to Run Tables in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 RTC or NAV 2013

ArcherPoint How-To Blog: Step-by-step instructions on how to perform specific tasks in Microsoft Dynamics NAV

For consultants who are not a developers, it is frustrating not to be able to “Run Tables” as we used to do from the Dynamics NAV Classic Client Object Designer. We frequently need to Run Tables for diagnostic and analysis purposes. There is a very simple solution.

Example:

You want to make a list of all of the Production Output for a period of time. To do this, you need to see all of the Item Ledger Entries in the system and then filter on Entry Type = “Output” and a Date Range.

From any Item Card, drill down on Quantity on Hand:

From Item Card, drill down on Quantity on Hand

Figure 1 – From any Item Card, drill down on Quantity on Hand

This will give you a list of the Item Ledger Entries for the current item:

List of Item Ledger Entries for the current item

Figure 2 – List of Item Ledger Entries for the current item

To see all of the Item Ledger Entries in the system remove the Item No. filter:

Remove the Item No. filter to see all the items

Figure 3 – Remove the Item No. filter to see all the items

Then set filters to get the information that you are looking for. In this example, we have set the Entry Type to “Output” to create a list of all of the Production Output:

Set the filters to get the information of interest

Figure 4 – Set the filters to get the information of interest

You can then export this list to Excel.

We hope that this was helpful.

For more information on this or other Microsoft Dynamics NAV topics, please contact ArcherPoint.

Read more "How To" blogs from ArcherPoint for practical advice on using Microsoft Dynamics NAV.

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Comments

Comment: 

You can still run a table from the NAV development environment just by finding it in the object designer and hitting Run. The system creates a page for it automatically and fills it with all the table fields. 

Comment: 

Hello Tom,

I was addressing this from the view point of someone who doesn't have access to the development environment.

Michael Heydasch's picture

Comment: 

Thanks Bob.   One other little tidbit of advice ... if at all possible, before applying a filter, try to select a different key that includes one or more fields for which the user will filter.   In the example provided above, the user kept the "Entry No." key and then filtered by "Entry Type."  The user should look at the list of keys available, and see if a key exists that includes the "Entry Type" field ... select this key, and then filter by "Entry Type."   It might save a great deal of time if there are many, many records in the table.

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